Accession Number : ADA634939


Title :   Canine Antithrombin-III: Some Biochemical and Biologic Properties


Descriptive Note : Doctoral thesis


Corporate Author : UNIFORMED SERVICES UNIV OF THE HEALTH SCIENCES BETHESDA MD


Personal Author(s) : Sigmon, Hilary D


Full Text : http://www.dtic.mil/get-tr-doc/pdf?AD=ADA634939


Report Date : 02 Jun 1987


Pagination or Media Count : 93


Abstract : Coagulopathies have been reported to occur after many forms of stress and trauma. These thrombohemorrhagic responses are likely consequent to disturbances of the delicate interplay of the hemostatic compartments (vasculature, platelets, and plasma proteins), resulting in the systemic activation of the clotting-fibrinolytic (and other) systems with eventual depletion of critical hemostatic components. This syndrome* of generalized intravascular proteolysis or disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), an intermediary mechanism of disease, is usually (but not always) associated with well-defined clinical entities. It can manifest as a wide clinical spectrum. For example, if the intravascular clotting process is dominant and secondary fibrino(geno)lysis minimal, DIC may be expressed primarily as diffuse thromboses, as in malignancy. Alternatively, if the secondary fibrinolysis which occurs with DIC is dominant, and the drive toward procoagulant activity minimal, the clinical manifestations will be hemorrhage, by far the more common expression of DIC (1-4). Patients often demonstrate combinations of these two clinical manifestations. Thus, DIC represents a wide spectrum of clinical findings with patients presenting anywhere in the continuum between diffuse thromboses and/or hemorrhage (1,4,5).


Descriptors :   *BIOCHEMISTRY , *BLOOD COAGULATION , *DOGS , *THROMBIN , BLOOD PLASMA , CHROMATOGRAPHY , FIBRINOGEN , IMMUNOLOGY , SAMPLING


Subject Categories : Biochemistry
      Anatomy and Physiology
      Medicine and Medical Research


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE