Accession Number : ADA594885


Title :   What We're Getting Wrong About Mexico


Descriptive Note : Journal article


Corporate Author : ARMY WAR COLLEGE CARLISLE BARRACKS PA


Personal Author(s) : Kan, Paul R


Full Text : http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a594885.pdf


Report Date : Jan 2011


Pagination or Media Count : 13


Abstract : There has been a very active debate over how to describe the violence occurring in Mexico. Is it narcoinsurgency, narcoterrorism, or a crime wave that is gripping Mexico? This is more than a mere academic debate. Such distinctions may not seem important as all insurgent groups, terrorist organizations, and organized crime syndicates share a number of organizational and operational characteristics. Defining the particular type of organized violence has deep and far-reaching implications for policy makers responsible for designing the strategies that need to be implemented by those who face this ongoing violence on a daily basis. Terms such as insurgency and terrorism create policy options and strategic choices distinct from those that would be in responses to criminality. High-intensity law enforcement is an imperfect approach to counter high-intensity crime, but it avoids the concept and policy traps presented by the various strategies associated with counterinsurgency and counterterrorism. The struggle against Mexico's violent entrepreneurs will be long and uncertain. As entrepreneurs of illegal businesses, the Mexican cartels will continue to innovate in their efforts to survive and generate profits. If such criminal innovation is to be countered, there needs to be mutually reinforcing cooperation from governments on both sides of the border. Hopefully, the result will be a more peaceful Mexico ensconced in a thriving and mutually beneficial relationship with the United States.


Descriptors :   *CRIMES , *DRUG SMUGGLING , *GOVERNMENT(FOREIGN) , *LAW ENFORCEMENT , *MEXICO , *POLICIES , *STRATEGY , COLOMBIA , COOPERATION , COUNTERINSURGENCY , COUNTERTERRORISM , INSURGENCY , KILLING , LOW INTENSITY CONFLICT , MOTIVATION , TERRORISM , UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT


Subject Categories : Government and Political Science
      Sociology and Law
      Unconventional Warfare


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE