Accession Number : ADA571307


Title :   Preliminary Comparison of the T-11 Advanced Tactical Parachute System with the T-10D Parachute, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, June 2010-November 2011


Descriptive Note : Interim rept. Jun 2010-Nov 2011


Corporate Author : ARMY PUBLIC HEALTH COMMAND ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND MD ARMY INST OF PUBLIC HEALTH


Personal Author(s) : Knapik, Joseph J ; Steelman, Ryan ; Hoedebecke, Kyle ; Graham, Bria ; Rankin, Shawn ; Klug, Kevin ; Proctor, Stanley ; Jones, Bruce H


Full Text : http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a571307.pdf


Report Date : Dec 2011


Pagination or Media Count : 36


Abstract : This preliminary report compares injury rates between the older T-10D parachute and the newer T-11 parachute. Data were systematically collected on jump operations performed by the 82nd Airborne Division (Fort Bragg, North Carolina) using these parachutes from June 2010 to November 2011. Data on injured jumpers included injury diagnosis, anatomical location, and how the injury occurred. Operational data from flight manifests and flash reports included the date and time of the jump, type of parachute, type of jump (administrative/non-tactical (Hollywood) or combat load), unit involved, drop zone, entanglements, Soldiers' rank, jump order (order in which the Soldiers exited the aircraft), door side (right, left, tailgate), and aircraft type. Temperature, humidity, and wind speed were obtained using a Kestrel Model 4500 pocket weather tracker. There were a total of 63,487 jumps resulting in 678 injured Soldiers for a crude injury incidence of 10.7/1,000 jumps. There were 59,370 jumps (94%) with the T-10 and 4,117 jumps (6%) with the T-11. Most injuries (85%) with a known injury mechanism were associated with ground impact. In univariate analysis, risk of injury with the T-10 was 11.1/1,000 jumps, and that with the T-11 was 5.3/1,000 jumps (risk ratio (T-10/T-11)=2.08, 95% confidence interval=1.35-3.13, p0.01). Other factors that independently increased injury risk included night jumps, combat loads, higher wind speeds, higher temperatures, and entanglements. After controlling for these factors in a multivariate analysis, injury risk was still higher for the T-10 parachute when compared to the T-11 (odds ratio (T-10/T-11)=1.64, 95%confidence interval=1.05-2.50, p=0.03). Most of the reduction in T-11 injury risk occurred during night jumps with combat loads, but there were very limited T-11 data under these conditions (941 jumps). There was only one nighttime combat loaded T-11 injury and that injury was a fatality.


Descriptors :   *PARACHUTES , GEOGRAPHIC AREAS , HUMIDITY , NORTH CAROLINA , SAFETY , TEMPERATURE , WIND VELOCITY , WOUNDS AND INJURIES


Subject Categories : Gliders and Parachutes


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE