Accession Number : ADA570693


Title :   Traditional Herbal Medicine Use Associated with Liver Fibrosis in Rural Rakai, Uganda


Descriptive Note : Journal article


Corporate Author : HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL BOSTON MA


Personal Author(s) : Auerbach, Brandon J ; Reynolds, Steven J ; Lamorde, Mohammed ; Merry, Concepta ; Kukunda-Byobona, Collins ; Ocama, Ponsiano ; Semeere, Aggrey S ; Ndyanabo, Anthony ; Boaz, Iga ; Kiggundo, Valerian ; Nalugoda, Fred ; Gray, Ron H ; Wawer, Maria J ; Thomas, David L ; Kirk, Gregory D ; Quinn, Thomas C ; Stabinski, Lara


Full Text : http://www.dtic.mil/get-tr-doc/pdf?AD=ADA570693


Report Date : 27 Nov 2012


Pagination or Media Count : 10


Abstract : Traditional herbal medicines are commonly used for HIV/ AIDS and other health conditions in Uganda and sub-Saharan Africa, often in parallel with programs that provide antiretroviral therapy (ART). In the 1990's an estimated 80% of Ugandans living in rural villages used traditional healers for primary health care [1]. A study of 137 HIV-infected Ugandans receiving ART found that 60% used herbs concurrently with ART [2]. In Uganda traditional herbal medicines are usually boiled extracts of herbs taken orally [3]. Some potentially hepatotoxic traditional herbal medicines used in Uganda and sub-Saharan Africa include Hoodia gordoni [4], kava [5], Phytolacca dioica [6], and herbs from the Asteraceae family [7]. Little is known about the hepatotoxicity of other commonly used herbs or the contribution of herbs to the burden of liver fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in sub- Saharan Africa, including when used concomitantly with ART. Data on the specific types of herbs taken by HIV-infected persons in Uganda is limited, as is information about their components, side effects, toxicities, and ART interactions [8]. In Rakai, Uganda, liver toxicity associated with herbal medicine may be of particular concern given the high prevalence of significant liver disease (17%) among HIV-infected persons in Rakai recently identified by transient elastography (FibroScanH Echosense, Paris, France) [9]. In the aforementioned study reported herbal medicine use was associated with a two-fold increased risk of significant liver disease, defined as a transient elastography score equivalent to METAVIR liver fibrosis stage 2 (portal fibrosis with few septa) or greater [9]. The study presented here follows up on this prior investigation with an in-depth analysis of the herbs used by study participants and their relation to liver fibrosis.


Descriptors :   *FIBROSIS , HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUSES , LIVER DISEASES , MEDICINE , PHARMACOLOGY , PLANTS(BOTANY) , RATIOS , SUBSAHARAN AFRICA , TOXICITY , UGANDA , VILLAGES


Subject Categories : Medicine and Medical Research


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE