Accession Number : ADA567327


Title :   Understanding Swift Trust to Improve Interagency Collaboration in New York City


Descriptive Note : Master's thesis


Corporate Author : NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA DEPT OF NATIONAL SECURITY AFFAIRS


Personal Author(s) : Fahy, Michael J


Full Text : http://www.dtic.mil/get-tr-doc/pdf?AD=ADA567327


Report Date : Sep 2012


Pagination or Media Count : 95


Abstract : For over a decade, homeland security leaders have urged emergency response agencies to improve their collaborative capacity. Collaboration and coordination are critical to homeland security effectiveness. The homeland security threat scenarios facing NYC, including terrorist attacks, natural disasters, and high- consequence accidents, require a synergistic response from first responders. To better understand the foundation of the collaborative relationship between the New York City Fire Department (FDNY) and the New York City Police Department (NYPD), this thesis examines the concept of swift trust. Swift trust is a unique form of trust that occurs between groups or individuals brought together in temporary teams to accomplish specific tasks, often under time constraints. The thesis examines swift trust formation in military groups, business groups, and virtual groups. It applies the factors critical to swift trust formation in those groups to interagency incidents involving the NYPD and FDNY. Among the factors affecting the formation of swift trust among NYC first responders are initial interactions and communications, identification of roles and assigned tasks, formulation of a team identity, and organizational culture. The research reveals organizational and procedural barriers that prevent members of the FDNY and NYPD from developing swift trust, thus inhibiting collaboration.


Descriptors :   *EMERGENCIES , *FIRE FIGHTING , *FIRST RESPONDERS , *HOMELAND SECURITY , *INTERAGENCY COORDINATION , *NEW YORK(NEW YORK) , *POLICE , COMMERCE , COOPERATION , CULTURE , INFORMATION EXCHANGE , INTERACTIONS , INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS , MILITARY PERSONNEL , POLICIES , TEAMS(PERSONNEL) , THESES


Subject Categories : Government and Political Science
      Psychology
      Civil Defense


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE