Accession Number : ADA527809


Title :   The Information Technology Program Manager's Dilemma: Rapidly Evolving Technology and Stagnant Processes


Descriptive Note : Journal article


Corporate Author : DEFENSE ACQUISITION UNIV FT BELVOIR VA


Personal Author(s) : Peake, Kathy


Full Text : http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a527809.pdf


Report Date : Aug 2010


Pagination or Media Count : 6


Abstract : Since inception, the Department of Defense's development of acquisition policies and guidance has been focused on the creation and deployment of traditional weapons systems -- such as planes, ground vehicles, and ships -- in support of the warfighter. Some may see the existing DoD process for acquiring those systems as complex; however, the current procedures, as outlined in DoD Instruction 5000.02, offer a more defined approach for weapons systems acquisition than for the acquisition of information technology systems. The current DoDI 5000.02 leaves IT project and program managers wondering how the current process applies to them, as the guidance is fairly rigid and does not allow for the flexibility required to appropriately manage IT programs. Until very recently, in comparison to the development of a traditional weapons system, IT programs seemed to have been viewed as a utility or service instead of a critical component to national security. Perhaps that is because data passing through cables cannot be observed with the naked senses and therefore an out of sight, out of mind philosophy is applied when it comes to policy and guidance. At a recent conference, military leaders admitted that they did not completely understand the role of IT in operations; however, with so much attention being brought to the issue, that may be changing. Operational commanders are now realizing that they have a real need to understand IT as it affects operations and the decisions regarding IT that are being made by others. As with weapons systems, the solution for IT acquisition program managers is to tailor the DoDI 5000.02 to their perspective programs. That does not, however, address the three major issues associated with information technology programs: the rate of technological improvements in capability, the processes for both acquiring and fielding new IT components, and funding for IT programs.


Descriptors :   *INFORMATION SYSTEMS , *POLICIES , *PLANNING PROGRAMMING BUDGETING , *MILITARY PROCUREMENT , *INSTRUCTIONS , *LIMITATIONS , *PROJECT MANAGEMENT , STAGNATION , MILITARY BUDGETS , DEPLOYMENT , DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE , REPRINTS , BARRIERS


Subject Categories : Administration and Management
      Information Science
      Computer Systems
      Logistics, Military Facilities and Supplies


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE