Accession Number : ADA477011


Title :   Why Efforts to Centralize the US Intelligence Community Fail


Descriptive Note : Master's thesis


Corporate Author : AIR UNIV MAXWELL AFB AL SCHOOL OF ADVANCED AIR AND SPACE STUDIES


Personal Author(s) : Jones, Daniel B.


Full Text : http://www.dtic.mil/get-tr-doc/pdf?AD=ADA477011


Report Date : JUN 2005


Pagination or Media Count : 90


Abstract : Prior to World War II, the formal collection and exploitation of foreign intelligence in the United States fell almost exclusively in the domain of the military. The attack on Pearl harbor and other events during that war created a growing consensus that the nation required a central authority to manage national intelligence pertinent to multiple departments of the government. In response, the National Security Act of 1947 created the Central Intelligence Agency and the position of Director of Central Intelligence. Over the next half-century, numerous commissions and panels found neither the agency nor the director wielded effective control of the diverse and growing intelligence community. In response to such findings, Presidents issued National Security Council directives and executive orders and Congress signed multiple bills to reinforce the CIA and DCI's authority over the intelligence community, but the problems of decentralization persist. The terrorist attack of 9/11 provided sufficient impetus to make the first significant structural changes to the failed US intelligence community since 1947.


Descriptors :   *MILITARY INTELLIGENCE , *NATIONAL SECURITY , *DECENTRALIZATION , WARFARE , CONGRESS , THESES , LEGISLATION , SECOND WORLD WAR , PEARL HARBOR , TERRORISM , HISTORY , ATTACK , DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE , UNITED STATES


Subject Categories : MILITARY INTELLIGENCE


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE