Accession Number : ADA442208


Title :   A Study on the Bionomics of Anopheles darlingi Root (Diptera: Culicidae) in Belize, Central America


Descriptive Note : Doctoral thesis


Corporate Author : UNIFORMED SERVICES UNIV OF THE HEALTH SCIENCES BETHESDA MD F EDWARD HEBERT SCHOOL OF MEDICINE


Personal Author(s) : Achee, Nicole


Full Text : http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a442208.pdf


Report Date : Mar 2004


Pagination or Media Count : 321


Abstract : Interdisciplinary studies were conducted to describe the bionomics of the malaria vector Anopheles darlingi Root in Belize, Central America. Studies investigated the following: nightly adult biting patterns; seasonal population densities; flight behavior patterns; the role of overhanging bamboo in larval habitat preference; the association between deforestation and bamboo growth; and the associations between land cover and river characteristics to the distribution of positive larval habitats. Results from all-night biting studies show An. darlingi to exhibit a bimodal peak activity pattern with biting continuing throughout the night at similar rates both indoors and outside of an experimental hut (I:O=1.00:0.96). Population studies show An. darlingi to have its densest populations during seasonal transitional months including January and May/July. Results from flight behavior studies of An. darlingi females, using a newly designed portable hut, show the highest recapture rate was made at the 0 M distance (28.9%) from a fixed release point, then declined from 11.6% at 400 M to 5.8% at 800 M. Habitat preference studies indicate that overhanging bamboo is not an An. darlingi breeding site selection criterion. Experimental plots in which bamboo was hung above detritus consistently showed significantly fewer An. darlingi larvae than plots with detritus alone and similar numbers as in open water control plots. Studies combining field mapping with remote sensing along cleared (i.e., deforested) and undisturbed (i.e., forested) transects within two river systems showed no associations between land cover adjacent to the rivers and bamboo growth. Results were consistent using both SPOT (20-m resolution) and IKONOS (4-m resolution) satellite imagery. In addition, overhanging bamboo was not the primary contributor to the formation of potential An. darlingi larval habitats formed within a 48-km transect of the Sibun River.


Descriptors :   *LARVAE , *DIPTERA , *CULICIDAE , *BELIZE , *ANOPHELES , DENSITY , POSITION(LOCATION) , POPULATION , SEASONAL VARIATIONS , TREES , CENTRAL AMERICA , SATELLITE IMAGERY , OPEN WATER , ECOLOGY , REMOTE DETECTORS , RELEASE , FLIGHT ENVELOPE , RIVERS , HABITATS


Subject Categories : Biology


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE